The Solution to Pollutants

The Camfil Group is a world leader in the development and production of air filters and clean air solutions. We manufacture and supply products that satisfy all the demands at airports to control particulate and molecular pollutants. These products also satisfy the recommendations of EN13779.

The European standard EN 13779:2007 focuses on achieving a comfortable and healthy indoor environment in all seasons with acceptable installation and running costs. It is now a national standard in all countries. It specifies the required filter performance in a system to achieve good Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) taking into consideration the outdoor air.

The Solution to PollutantsVarious solutions are available depending on the extent of the pollution problem. Molecular filtration may be applied in either the fresh air make-up or recirculation air systems.

Solutions for makeup air are preferred since the principal sources of pollutant are external. These tend to be more heavy duty and reflect the high pollutant concentrations and one-pass operation. Solutions for recirculation applications reflect lower ambient concentrations and multi-pass operation. Continue reading

Camfil Case Study published in Government’s Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) Guide

The Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC) has published the Government Response to the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) consultation with guidance for potential scheme participants.  The guide includes a Case Study on the successful implementation of ISO 5001 by Camfil UK.

ESOSDownload the document here.

DECC has published the Government Response to the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) consultation and laid regulations in Parliament to give legal effect to the scheme, and published guidance for potential scheme participants.

A copy of the Government Response and DECC Guidance can be found at: www.gov.uk/government/consultations/energy-savings-opportunity-scheme.

ESOS is an energy assessment scheme that is mandatory for organisations in the UK that meet the qualification criteria. The Environment Agency is the UK scheme administrator.  Organisations that qualify for ESOS must carry out ESOS assessments every 4 years. These assessments are audits of the energy used by their buildings, industrial processes and transport to identify cost-effective energy saving measures. Continue reading

Improve ventilation in schools to avoid failing the IAQ test

The importance of good ventilation within schools has been recognised for many years however, there are a number of schools that are still failing to meet the most basic levels of indoor air quality (IAQ).IAQ in schools

As the Government strives to achieve its’ carbon reduction targets, there has been a shift towards “zero-leakage” and airtight buildings have become standard across the building industry. With the focus on making buildings more energy efficient, it has been said that this is responsible, at least in part, for a legacy of poor indoor air quality (IAQ).

Worryingly, the problem seems most serious in schools; and with growing evidence now showing that there are links between outbreaks of winter flu and poor classroom IAQ it has naturally given rise to serious concerns about the long-term health implications for children. Part of the problem is that the unique design and use of school buildings can exacerbate the impact of poor quality indoor air. Asthma, for example, is a well-known risk of indoor air pollution, but it is also a risk that grows as space becomes more densely packed with individuals. And educational facilities tend to be particularly densely populated.

Poor ventilation is a serious issue, excessive condensation can cause mould growth, leading to cosmetic and structural damage to the fabric of the building, which can lead to extremely poor IAQ. This then causes potential health issues for the buildings occupants.

In recent years, the health effects of poor IAQ have been gaining increased attention. Air pollution (both indoor and outdoor) has been linked to heart disease, cancer, and serious respiratory conditions. In 2013, the International Agency for Research on Cancer — an arm of the World Health Organization (WHO), classified air pollution as a Group 1 human carcinogen. WHO estimates that indoor air pollution — the result of harmful particles within indoor environments, as well as outdoor pollutants that seep inside — was responsible for some 4.3 million deaths worldwide in 2012. Continue reading