Nearly a quarter of school children and workers in London at risk from deadly air pollution

Nearly 25% of all school children in London and 44% of the Capital’s workforce are exposed to levels of air pollution that exceed legal and healthy limits.

air pollution

A shocking report has been published today warning that almost a quarter of school children in London are being forced to breathe air so toxic that it breaches EU legal limits. The findings will no doubt alarm the parents of the 328,000 pupils who are at schools where nitrogen dioxide levels were above the annual permitted level. It’s also extremely alarming that 44% of the City’s workforce, are also exposed to dangerous levels of air pollution.

The report, Up in the Air, by Policy Exchange’s Capital City Foundation and King’s College London, analyses data from over 100 air quality monitoring sites across London. It shows the most polluted parts of the Capital currently have levels of Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) nearly four times the legal limit. The research finds that 12.5% of the total area of the Capital currently exceeds the legal limit for NO2, and that deprived parts of London are more likely to be affected.

The report highlights some startling numbers:

  • 328,000 school children and 3.8million workers in London are exposed to unhealthy levels of Nitrogen Dioxide which is linked to asthma and respiratory infections.
  • 979 out of a total of 3,161 schools in London are over the limit for NO2. The data includes primary and secondary schools, including independent schools.
  • Children attending schools in Inner London boroughs such as Westminster, Tower Hamlets, Southwark and Camden are particularly at risk to harmful levels of NO2

The report says that while many good initiatives have been put in place to combat poor air quality in the Capital, London’s air pollution problem is still far from being solved. It puts the failure to control NO2 emissions down to the growth in the number of diesel vehicles, including buses, taxis and diesel cars.

  • Diesel cars have systematically failed to match up to emissions standards due to illegal and legal cheating of emissions tests.
  • The ongoing growth in decentralised energy across London could also pose a threat to air quality. Gas combustion in buildings could be responsible for 48% of NOx emissions by 2025 in Central London.

Up in the airDownload it here

New analysis reveals that if improvements in NO2 levels are delivered in full by 2025, then this could lead to an improvement in life expectancy of around six months. However this is in doubt given the slow progress on NO2 pollution to date.

We are currently offering a no obligation IAQ particle analysis for UK schools. This will advise on the concentrations of any airborne contaminants. To validate this process, we will demonstrate our high performance mobile air cleaners. These are fitted with the most efficient Absolute™ HEPA filters on the market. Camfil air cleaners create a clean, safe environment by removing errant particles and VOCs from the air in localised areas. They can work as a supplement to existing filtration systems and can be used in all areas.

Our air cleaners can be used in:

  • Classrooms
  • Corridors
  • Staff rooms
  • Gymnasiums
  • Laboratories
  • Main Halls

To arrange an IAQ particle analysis test, email

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Improve Indoor Air Quality with Camfil Air Cleaners

Indoor air quality (IAQ) is a term which refers to the air quality within and around buildings and structures, especially as it relates to the health and comfort of building occupants. Indoor air quality is not as good as you think, it can be even more polluted than air on an average city street.

Download the following presentation to find out how to improve the indoor air quality where you are:

Indoor air quality refers to the aerosol and gas content, temperature, and humidity of the air inside a structure. In the case of human habitation, the quality of the air is determined by its ability to maintain the health and well-being of humans occupying the structure.

The most important part of indoor air quality is the cleanliness of the air. Air contamination consist of particles, gases and vapours that may reduce the well-being and health of humans and decrese the output and efficiency of production processes.

Outdoor air pollution infiltrates into buildings. Without appropriate ventilation, it accumulates and can even react with other indoor air pollutants.

Indoor air pollution is made of outdoor air pollutants, including heating and traffic particles and gases that infiltrate into our buildings as well as chemicals emissions from building materials, DIY products, cleaning products, air fresheners, combustion particles from heating, cooking and candles, pets allergens, electronics and appliances offgasing etc etc..

The way we live increases our exposure to air pollution

  • We spend close to 90% of our lives indoors.
  • Indoor air can be up to 50 times more polluted than outdoor.

There are a number of clean air solutions available to combat the issues relating to indoor air pollution. Download Indoor Air Quality – A human right from Camfil UK today!

To find out more about clean air solutions to help improve indoor air quality within your  environment, call the Camfil team on +44 (0)1706 238000 or email: and someone will come back to you shortly.

The air we breathe: nanoparticles and their role as a cardiovascular risk factor

The European Society of Cardiology hosted their Congress 2015 in London last month. The Congress is the world’s largest and most influential cardiovascular event.

the air we breatheA population-based approach is needed to tackle air pollution, which is now ranked ninth among the greatest modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease, according to conclusions at a Spotlight of the Congress Symposium yesterday.

Air pollution not only exacerbates existing heart conditions but even appears to play a part in their causation. The WHO estimated in 2012 that one in eight of total global deaths (around seven million each year) could be attributed to air pollution. The principal culprit appears to be fine nanoparticles known as particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) which occur in diesel and petrol exhaust.

David Newby from Edinburgh University said:

‘This ultrafine particulate matter is like a gas and can penetrate deeply into the lungs and reach the blood stream,’.
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