Campaign to highlight occupational cancer risks

Health and safety professionals are to discuss the challenge of tackling occupational cancer during a meeting in Birmingham.

Campaign to highlight occupational cancer risks

It is estimated that around 8,000 people die from cancer and roughly 14,000 contract the disease each year in the UK because of exposure to a work-related carcinogen, such as diesel exhaust fumes, silica dust or asbestos fibres.

The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) are running a campaign namely, No Time to Lose, which is seeking to cast a spotlight on work cancers and to help businesses and other organisations identify and overcome risks to employees.

Members of IOSH’s Midland Branch are due to debate the campaign and the issues it raises at the Hollyfields Centre Club, in Woodacre Road, Erdington, from 2pm on Thursday 5 February. Continue reading

Cleaner air for urban dwellers

The world is urbanising and people are migrating to city centres for many reasons. We see this trend in statistics: more than 50 percent of the world’s population lives in cities today and the World Health Organisation (WHO) expects this proportion to increase in coming years.urban living

This urbanisation trend is impacting the economic, social and political setup of countries and regions. Urban crowding is also affecting life at street level – the air we breathe. In many metropolises, concentrations of particulate matter and harmful gases are already higher than WHO’s recommended limits.

Vehicle emissions – especially the content of diesel exhaust – are very much the villain in this drama and we need to be more aware about the dangers of breathing everything from very fine particles (PM2.5) to harmful gases like nitrogen dioxide. Continue reading

In London – breathing can kill you

4,300 people a year in London are dying prematurely as a result of air pollution.

air pollution

Diesel emissions take much of the blame for stubbornly high concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in recent years. London suffers the biggest cluster of pollutant limit breaches in the UK and the UK is subject to infraction action by the European Commission that could result in fines in the hundreds of millions

The Mayor and Transport for London (TfL) launched a public consultation last week on proposals to introduce the world’s first Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) in the capital by September 2020, to significantly improve air quality and in turn the health of Londoners.

The London Assembly’s Environment Committee will tomorrow assess the contribution of diesel emissions to London’s air pollution problems and explore the potential of modern engine technologies, as well as air quality regulations, to reduce these emissions. Continue reading