The air we breathe: nanoparticles and their role as a cardiovascular risk factor

The European Society of Cardiology hosted their Congress 2015 in London last month. The Congress is the world’s largest and most influential cardiovascular event.

the air we breatheA population-based approach is needed to tackle air pollution, which is now ranked ninth among the greatest modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease, according to conclusions at a Spotlight of the Congress Symposium yesterday.

Air pollution not only exacerbates existing heart conditions but even appears to play a part in their causation. The WHO estimated in 2012 that one in eight of total global deaths (around seven million each year) could be attributed to air pollution. The principal culprit appears to be fine nanoparticles known as particulate matter (PM) ≤2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) which occur in diesel and petrol exhaust.

David Newby from Edinburgh University said:

‘This ultrafine particulate matter is like a gas and can penetrate deeply into the lungs and reach the blood stream,’.
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Camfil air filters reduced air pollution by up to 93% during worst smog episode

clean-air-logoArticle by Simon Birkett. Founder and Director, Clean Air in London.

On 18th March, the daily mean outdoor particle air pollution (PM2.5) hit 346 mg/m3 , nearly 14 times the World Health Organisation guideline.

Five air filter combinations were tested by Camfil. Additional standalone air filter units within an office can reduce office-generated pollutants and emissions e.g. volatile organic compounds

Camfil has sponsored Clean Air in London’s campaign to build public understanding of indoor air quality since 2011.

IAQ reportCamfil’s international testing team analysed air pollution in London between 16 and 20 March 2015.

They monitored ambient, or outdoor, air pollution and indoor air quality in Montague Place in central London and tested one or two air filter combinations each day in the office’s air handling unit. Camfil’s report can be downloaded here: Camfil IAQ London report

Camfil’s monitoring coincided with the worst air pollution episode so far this year.

On Wednesday 18 March, Camfil recorded a daily mean for fine particles (PM2.5) in outdoor air of 346 micrograms per cubic metre (mg/m3) which is nearly 14 times the World Health Organisation (WHO) guideline. They also recorded between 300,000,000 and 400,000,000 particles per cubic metre with a diameter between 0.3 microns (mm) and 0.5 mm. Continue reading

Fresh reports highlight London’s efforts to deal with growing air quality problems and reduce air pollution-related deaths

In July, King’s College of London and the Greater London Authority (GLA) released two reports commenting on the negative health impacts of air pollution in London and the Mayor’s on-going efforts and progress to deal with the city’s air quality problems.

9500 deaths in London

Nearly 9,500 deaths from long-term exposure to NO2 and PM2.5

For the first time in the world, King’s College London, commissioned by the Greater London Authority and Transport for London, has used emerging techniques to calculate the health impacts associated with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in London. This new study shows that in 2010 there was the equivalent of up to 5,900 deaths across London associated with long-term exposure to NO2.

At the same time, deaths associated with long-term exposure to PM2.5 were recalculated from 4,300 (in 2008 based on 2006 concentrations) to 3,500 (in 2010). The PM2.5 and NO2 figures can be combined to create a total figure of up to 9,400 equivalent deaths in 2010*. Continue reading