Make Buildings Safe Havens

 

peterDid you join the Building Engineering Services Association (BESA) event about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) on the June 15th? Speaking at the Event Simon Birkett, Founder of Clean Air London, talked about the importance of protecting our Indoor Air Quality.

During the event it was announced that their would be a new working group set out to publish the Industry first IAQ standard in the UK. The Standard will outline ways in which the industry can respond to the growing need for internal clean air zones in the face of the rising levels of toxic emissions outdoors.

This standard will outline the fact that IAQ measures are relatively cheap and easy to deliver with simple solutions of changing to filters that Achieve ePM1 ratings when compared to new air filtration standard ISO16890

Air Pollution and our Changing world

In the UK Air pollution is not a new problem that has surfaced overnight. The London smog of 1952 killed 12,000 people. Since then, changes in the way we live have also changed the type of air pollution that we breathe. Coal burning has fallen dramatically, but today increased road transport and the failure to control some exhausts from diesel vehicles has led to us being exposed to new air pollutants.

Around the world, there are many examples where reducing air pollution has improved public health. It now seems likely that childhood exposure to air pollution has a lasting influence on health, so the gains from tackling air pollution today will be felt throughout the decades to come.

Key facts

In 2012, road traffic in the UK was ten times higher than in 1949. Total distance walked each year decreased by 30% between 1995 and 2013.

  • Growth in pollution has not always been as fast as growth in traffic, thanks to tighter exhaust controls. Modern cars produce very little carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and the sulphur and lead in diesel and petrol must meet tight regulations.
  • Nitrogen dioxide and particulates from diesel engines have been poorly controlled and these remain a problem. In the UK today, about half of cars run on diesel. This is the trend across Europe, but not in the USA or Japan. Nearly all buses, vans and lorries, forms of water transport, and many trains, use diesel in the UK, along with construction and farm machinery.
  • Each year, inhaling particulates causes around 29,000 deaths in the UK, which, on recent evidence, may rise to around 40,000 deaths when also considering nitrogen dioxide exposure.
  • Air pollution can stay around for days or weeks after it’s created. One type of chemical may interact with others in the atmosphere, to cause even more pollution. Air pollution also crosses cities, counties and even countries, so local action is not enough on its own.

Reproduced from: Royal College of Physicians. Every breath we take: the lifelong impact of air pollution. Report of a working party – 20-page summary document. London: RCP, 2016.

Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Physicians. Reproduced with permission.

New video released on the effects of PM1 particles on your body

Particulate Matter (PM) is present in every breath you take and it comes in a range of different sizes. Particulate Matter is measured in a range of different sizes with the most common from PM10 (10 micron Particles or less), PM2.5 (2.5 micron particles or less) or PM1 particles (1 Micron Particles). Our body has built in defenses against many of these particle sizes but some can penetrate deeper than others.

The PM1 particle is the size that penetrated deepest into the human body. Find out more about this particle in the video below